The Beauty of Zero Waste

As acknowledged by one of today’s most up and coming Zero Waste spokespeople, Bea Johnson, many have this misconception that zero waste means more mess, complication, spending, and stress in a person’s life.

While I have yet to be entirely zero waste, and, no, my home does not have the simple white walls and beautifully uncluttered rooms of a minimalist, I can confidently advise any spectators not to subscribe to that idea. Zero waste means simplicity, and more often than not, it ends up looking more beautiful than a life of trash production.

Personally, I think my jar of water is prettier than bottled water…
photo 1 (5)

For instance, yesterday I went out to eat with one of my friends, Carolyn, after staying up till 4:30 am the night before finishing summer assignments (I’m actually typing up this post as a break from reading “Wuthering Heights”). With me, I brought a large square container, a fork, spoon, and napkin, a mason jar for water(which I put rosemary in for flavoring), my wallet, and a smaller jar, all carried in my favorite tote bag. photo (7)

I was able to order a sandwich at a Mediterranean restaurant. They still put tinfoil
around it despite my request for them not to, so here is all my trash from yesterday’s lunch:photo 1 (3)
photo (8)Then, Carolyn and I went to a frozen yogurt place, in which I requested to use my smaller jar. The cashier was fine with it, and weighed my jar before I put anything in it, so as not to pay extra for its weight. Then, I did as any other customer does, and filled my jar with delicious strawberry and mango frozen yogurt. In my opinion, as well as others, as I did get photo 2 (3)compliments at the store, the jar makes the food look a LOT prettier.

Prettier food, prettier planet. What could be the down side?

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4 thoughts on “The Beauty of Zero Waste

  1. I agree! It does make it prettier. I personally think we can’t be completely zero waste but we can do as much to prevent as most waste as the “average”. Once I took my handmade tote bag (made of ready meals pouches sewn together) to the grocery store and they looked at it weird, but kind of with admiration, but no one asked anything. Best I reused my cereal liners to carry my loose vegetables and fruits and the cashier noticed that weren’t in the regular plastic bag they offer, then she made a friendly comment about how creative that was. I try to avoid buying more plastic but rising the ones I once bought. I hope that gives the other side of “zero waste” lifestyle. Loved your post! I will try to carry my water in a glass jar, it does indeed look better
    Cheers! 💚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much for commenting! It’s soo freakin cool that you reuse your cereal bag liners. My family doesn’t reuse them, but we terracyle them. Terracycle is an upcycling company based in New Jersey, and I’m lucky to have a collection station in one of my town’s churches.
      Here’s the US link if you’re interested:

      https://www.terracycle.com/en-US/

      And here’s the UK link:

      http://www.terracycle.co.uk/en-UK/

      What I’ve been doing is taking old t shirts and sewing them into reusable produce bags. It will take us a little longer to accumulate enough to completely rely on them, but it saves money from having to buy produce bags, reduces textile waste, and saves water (as it takes a lot of water to make cloth). In the meantime, we’ve been trying to, as you mentioned, reuse our disposable plastic produce bags, which is working pretty great too!
      I think doing something like bringing your own produce bags or bringing your own containers when you eat out is so awesome because it’s really accessible to the average consumer. People are often reluctant to go zero waste or low waste because they don’t want to have to give up something, but in those situations you’re able to do something significant with regard to your trash production, without having to eat or consume differently.
      I look forward to hearing about your mason jars!

      Liked by 1 person

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